Purim Potstickers

Written by Nossi Fogel on Tuesday, 15 March 2011. Posted in Food Mood

Hello there. This is the first time I’ve ever done a guest post on a blog before so be easy on me. First a little about myself. My name is Nossi Fogel, and I have a blog called The Kosher Gastronome, head on over there, and check out how much fun you’ve been missing out on. Go on, I’ll wait.

I live in Baltimore, Maryland, where I am currently in my 3rd year in the University of Maryland dental school. The only thing I love more than scraping calcified plaque off of people’s teeth is cooking. On a scale of “check him into a psych ward” to “nothing to worry about” I’d say my obsession with food is at “it’s a problem.” So anyway, one day last year I decided to chronicle my problem on the internet for all to see, and that’s where we are today.

Okay Mr Gastronome, enough chit-chat, let’s see what you got.

All right, so as I’m sure we all know, Purim is right around the corner, and I’m sure you’re all eager to figure out what you should make for the seuda. Well be eager no more, because I have just the thing. It will wow your guests, be a little different while keeping within the confines of tradition. Is that possible?! Well read on.

Some of you out there know that there are three times a year when it’s customary to serve kreplach, erev Yom Kippur, Hoshana Rabba, and Purim. The reason behind this is, these three days are Yomim Tovim, but you are allowed to work, so the essence of the Yom Tov is nistar (hidden). So we commemorate that by eating kreplach, which is essentially meat “hidden” in dough.

All right so how can we take kreplach, and make them awesomer? I’ll tell you, by traveling west young grasshopper, to the orient. We’re going to make potstickers.

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Potstickers are like wontons, but instead of boiling them, we’re going to sautee them, and then let them steam for a little longer. The thing about potstickers that make me want to go get some right now, is that they’re chewy and kinda crispy at the same time, and oh so flavorful.

The reason why they’re called potstickers is because they never stick to your pot…I make joke! They stick to your pot, duh! You start with a non non-stick pot (a “stick pot?” if you think about it, you want it to stick to your pot, so no, a non-stick pot won’t work) on high heat, and add just a tiny bit of oil, brush it around, plop these thingys down, and leave them for 2 minutes without touching them. This causes them to form this nice little crust. Then you throw some liquid in the pot, it will sizzle like crazy, and you quickly put a lid on the pot, and lower to low heat, and don’t take off the lid for another whole 2 minutes, and that cooks the rest of it by steaming it. It’s really not that bad once you get the hand of it.

To make the potsticker, you take two wonton wrappers, and stuff them with a meat filling, and fold them up all nice and pretty, and sautee them.

All right let’s talk filling for the potstickers.

Assuming you’re still reading, which you’re probably not…in which case, how would you be reading this…wait, what? I’m lost…ok, that was weird…Anyway – if you’re an avid follower of The Kosher Gastronome, you’ll no doubt know by now, that I recently received some free food from Joburg Kosher. They sent me biltong and boerewors to try out. I’ll spare you the details (meaning: head on over to TheKosherGastronome.wordpress.com for the details), but all you need to know is that I was left with 2 boerewors to figure out what to do with them.

Can you see where I’m going with this?

I figured to myself – I’ve grilled boerewors like a regular plebian, but now let’s make something magical. So me thinks, these sausages are just ground meat with different spices, stuffed into an edible casing, so why not take out the meat, and make them into potstickers! Genius, right??! Yeah, I know.

The rest is history. Grab some boerewors (or whatever meat you’re using, but heck go crazy, order some Joberg Kosher boerewors, and use that…shameless plug), and take off the casings, and mix it together with your chopped scallions, pepper, lightly beaten egg, ketchup, mustard, Worcestershire sauce, brown sugar, black pepper, and cayenne pepper, and mix them all together (Chill brosef, all the amounts and directions are gonna be below…).

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Then take a wonton wrapper, and place it in front of you, in the shape of a diamond, and place a teaspoon of meat mixture in the middle, azoy. You really don’t want to put more than a teaspoon of filling.

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Then take some water, and brush it on the two edges away from you, and fold over, and try and make sure to press out all the air from the inside.

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And then to make the traditional potsticker look, you make two folds on each side, making sure to press them down tight, like so.

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Then grab your non-stick pan, and get it nice and hot over medium heat, and brush a tiny bit of oil (you do want it to come off eventually), and place a bunch down, and let it sit for two minutes.

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Then after 2 minutes, take your chicken stock, and pour it into the skillet, cover, and turn to low, for another 2 minutes.

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Then use some tongs to take them out, and let them cool.

Now to serve, you can serve alongside some hoisin sauce, or you can make your own dipping sauce. Combine honey, soy sauce, and some hoisin, and what the heck, some sriracha sauce, whisk together, and there you have it, awesomeness.

 

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That’s all folks, thanks for bearing with me, and make sure to head on over to The Kosher Gastronome.

 

Boerewors Potstickers

Ingredients:

  • ½ pound ground meat, or boerewors
  • ¼ cup finely chopped scallions
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped red bell pepper
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • 2 teaspoons ketchup
  • 1 teaspoon yellow mustard
  • 2 teaspoons worcestershire sauce
  • 1 teaspoon light brown sugar
  • 1½ teaspoons salt
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 35 to 40 small wonton wrappers
  • Water, for sealing wontons
  • 3 to 4 tablespoons vegetable oil, for frying
  • 1⅓ cups chicken stock, divided

 

 

Directions:

1. If you’re planning on keeping them warm while you wait for your guests to show up. Preheat oven to 200 degrees F.

2. Combine the first 11 ingredients in a medium-size mixing bowl (meat through cayenne). Set aside.

3.To form the dumplings, remove 1 wonton wrapper from the package, covering the others with a damp cloth. Brush 2 of the edges of the wrapper lightly with water. Place 1 teaspoon of the meat mixture in the center of the wrapper. Fold over, seal edges, and shape as desired. Set on a sheet pan and cover with a damp cloth. Repeat procedure until all of the filling is gone.

If you want to freeze these for another time, now’s the time. Place them in the freezer on the sheet pan, and when they’re completely frozen, you can place them all in a Ziploc bag.

4. Heat a 12-inch saute pan over medium heat. Brush with vegetable oil once hot. Add 8 to 10 potstickers at a time to the pan and cook for 2 minutes, without touching. Once the 2 minutes are up, gently add 1/3 cup chicken stock to the pan, turn the heat down to low, cover, and cook for another 2 minutes. Remove wontons to a heatproof platter and place in the warm oven. Clean the pan in between batches by pouring in water and allowing the pan to deglaze. Repeat until all the wontons are cooked.

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About the Author

Nossi Fogel

Nossi Fogel lives in Baltimore, Maryland, where he is currently in his 3rd year in the University of Maryland dental school.

He writes The Kosher Gastronome blog.

 

Comments (3)

  • THERABASH
    16 March 2011 at 22:49 |

    What a great idea! Love your style of writing, very easy to follow and vastly entertaining. Thanks for sharing!

  • thekoshergastronome
    18 March 2011 at 14:23 |

    Thanks!

  • AidelK
    26 February 2012 at 21:47 |

    Very clear tutorial with lots of useful information. The humor helps, too! Freilechen Purim!

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