Make Your Own Ice Cream

Written by Naomi Sugar on Tuesday, 06 March 2012. Posted in Tips And Tricks

After reading this article we realized two things: 1. Using an ice cream maker is not as hard as we thought, 2. We badly want/need an ice cream maker! It is now on our Purim/Pesach wish list... - CookKosher

 

Photo by Dan Engongoro
 
“I doubt whether the world holds for any one a more soul-stirring surprise than the first adventure with ice-cream.” ~ Heywood Broun

 
I still remember my first time like it was yesterday. It was a warm April day. The sun was shining. I got home from work early, giddy with excitement and eager anticipation. I have to admit though, I was nervous. What if The Husband found me? I was afraid of getting in trouble, of divulging my deepest secret. After all, I snuck this little toy into my apartment, and if he found me, oooh if he found me, what would I ever do?
 
And then it hit me. Who cares if someone finds out! I am so in love that I feel like shouting from the rooftop of my NYC apartment for the entire world to hear!
And that’s what I did. 
 
Listen up everyone. I MADE ICE CREAM FOR THE FIRST TIME! 
 
There, I said it. I feel so much better now!
 
That was 11 months ago, and the rest is history. 
 
I set out to write 365scoops with the intention of making a few flavors of ice cream a week, blogging about the experience, and sharing with you, my loyal readers, the recipes and how-to’s so that you could create the very same flavors at home. Along the way, I tasted every type of ice cream and gelato I could find, for...errrr...inspiration...and market research! Now I’ve become a self-proclaimed ice-cream-o-holic. I cannot live without ice cream. In fact, 365scoops has grown so much, that we cater parties, sell ice cream, and even do tastings and demonstrations (shameless plug: visit 365scoops.com to find out how to score a quart of ice cream for your freezer!
 
 
Using an ice cream maker for the first time can be a daunting experience. How do you know which one to buy? Should you choose the KitchenAid Ice Cream Bowl attachment for approximately $79.95 (Amazon is 10 dollars less!), the Cuisinart Ice Cream Maker with the extra freezer bowl for $69.95 or the classic Cuisinart Ice Cream Maker with just one bowl, for $36.99 (on sale!)? My suggestion is to buy the Cuisinart with two freezer bowls as it gives you the flexibility to make double batches of ice cream, or even two flavors in one day! Because the ice cream bowls cannot be used more than once in a 24 hour period (after the 20 minute churning process they are no longer cold enough to churn a second flavor), you’ll want to have a second bowl on hand just in case. It may seem like a luxury now, but having two bowls makes life so much easier! Also, if you want to keep extra paddles and tools on hand, Cuisinart allows you to buy a replacement paddle off their website for $5 and a replacement lid for $10. 
 
 
Lastly, because the ice cream bowl cannot be heated (in fact a scary warning sticker onthe outside reminds you never to heat the bowl) you cannot officially kasher it. But, the good news is that because the ice cream bowls are always freezing cold, they can be used both for dairy ice creams and pareve sorbets.
 
Once you’ve decided which machine to purchase, it’s time to get started. A word to the wise – the ice cream will not churn unless the bowl is frozen solid, which means it must freeze for 24 hours before use. Since making ice cream with this machine requires a day’s notice, I recommend always keeping your ice cream bowl in the freezer, that way, when the craving strikes, you have a fully-prepped ice cream bowl on hand! While it’s not necessary to keep the paddle in the freezer, I find that a cold paddle makes the ice cream churn better, so if you have room, keep it in the freezer as well. If not, pop it in the freezer 30 minutes before churning. 
 
 
One of the greatest features of the Cuisinart ice cream maker is that it essentially does all the work for you. While most machines take 20 minutes to churn the ice cream, it’s often hard to know whether the ice cream is actually ready after this time. With the Cuisinart, the paddle slows down, the ice cream thickens, and as a result, no longer churns as rapidly. Trust me, this thing is fool proof! When the ice cream is done churning it’s typically more like soft-serve; I recommend that you transfer to a freezer-safe container for at least 2 hours before serving so that you can scoop it beautifully into ice cream bowls!
 
As you get more advanced, you’ll notice that some ice creams churn faster than others. For example, chocolate ice cream generally churns and thickens faster than vanilla. Custards or French Style Ice Cream (those made with egg yolks) churn thicken faster than Philadelphia Style Ice Cream (those simply made with milk, cream, sugar, flavoring).  Lastly, when using alcohol, because it has a much lower freezing temperature, you’ll notice that it never fully freezes in the ice cream maker, nor in the freezer. “Alcoholic” ice cream or sorbet (even if it only contains 1 tbs!) is more liquid. Don’t worry after approximately 20 minutes it’s done churning - just make sure to harden in the freezer before serving.
 
And last, but certainly not least, when using mix-ins (such as cookies, chocolate chips, etc.) make sure to add them in the last 3-5 minutes of churning. Otherwise, because they are much heavier than the ice cream itself, they’ll fall right to the bottom and won’t actually mix into the ice cream. And whatever you do, never, ever, transfer an ice cream to the freezer without tasting it first. That’s simply unheard of. Always, always stick a spoon into the machine and steal bites. There’s a hole in the top of the lid for a reason!
 
Happy Ice Cream Making!
 
To get you started, 365scoops has provided you with a Chocolate & Caramel Cookies n' Cream ice cream recipe. Enjoy and happy scooping!

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About the Author

Naomi Sugar

Naomi Sugar is the author of 365scoops.com, a blog dedicated to making and sharing her ice cream creations. At  365scoops we believe in good, old fashioned ice cream free of preservatives (and ingredients that you cannot pronounce!) We mix only the best organic milks, creams, sugar and eggs, with a variety of flavors to create artisanal, custom-made flavors. Visit 365scoops.com to order some today. When she’s not creating ice cream, Naomi works for Project Sunshine and holds a master’s degree in public health from Columbia University.

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