Mishloach Manot Ideas II

Written by Cook Kosher on Monday, 27 February 2012. Posted in Table Toppers

Missed our first Mishloach Manot roundup?

What are Mishloach Manot? Mishloach Manot or Mishloach Manos are food baskets we exchange on Purim day. On the day of Purim one sends two items of food to at least one person. The Sages provide two reasons for the custom. One is to ensure that everyone has sufficient food for the Purim feast, another reason is to increase love and friendship between people. Ideally it should consistent of food that is ready to be eaten, and requires no additional preparation. 

Here are a couple of Mishloach Manot ideas to inspire you this Purim. 

 

Brunch at your door - keeping it rustic in a crate filled with banana walnut bread, jams and cider. 

Via VcsPhoto

 

Best cookie holder - an empty cd sleeve is the perfect cookie container. Sealed with a personalized tag, it's a great party favor. 

Via Intimate Weddings

 

 

 

Brown Bag  - paper can be transformed from simple to special with a little creativity. 

Via The Knot, Martha Stewart

 

 

Dinner Done - The best Mishloach Manos is a meal. With step by step instructions on the packaging it's meal even a kid can put together. 

Via Think Garnish

 

Dessert for Dinner - Make your own smores... no need to explain. 

Via Twig & Thistle

 

 

  

It's a wrap - Baskets, dishcloth as the wine wrapper and mason jars, it's all about how you wrap it up. 

Via - Martha Stewart, Studio Patro, Paula Deen

 

 

Breakfast for two - Feed them with food before they get full on the junk.  Just add ice cream - for the kids, or the kid in you. 

Via - Country Living & Tip Junkie

 

 

Fill it with love - a picture or washing cup can be the container for your drink and food. 

Via Noir Gifts

Wrap up your favorite bottle of wine with paper to coordinate with your color scheme. 

Via Noir Gifts

Social Bookmarks

About the Author

Comments (1)

  • AidelK
    05 March 2012 at 13:09 |

    These are really pretty, but I thought Shalach Manos had to be "ready to eat" when you give it. In other words, an assemblage of ingredients that must be cooked wouldn't really fulfill the mitzva.

Leave a comment

Please login to leave a comment.

Web Development Developed by Joomi
RADesign Designed by RADesign
zest CookKosher is a Zest Group project